Has the slasher film had its day?

It’s Halloween, everyone is entitled to one good scare or has the scare gone from the slasher film and its time to leave it behind us? Or more accurately we have a collection of slasher films that define this genre and recent attempts to add to the collection have fallen short. The origins of the Slasher can be traced back to Thirteen Woman in (1932) and in its wake came Michael Powels classic, Peeping Tom (1960), Halloween (1978) leading up to a Slasher bonanza in the 1980s leaving us with a host of horror villain heroes.

So we are asking, do you know of any recent slasher films that can stand next to the classics? And does the language defined in these films, screaming girls, blood splatter, demonic bad guys, helpless victims and hapless police seem lost and out of date for a modern horror film?

12 thoughts on “Has the slasher film had its day?

  • sugarsweet_no123@hotmail.co.uk'
    October 29, 2013 at 11:04 pm
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    Having watched my fair share of found footage films I came to the conclusion that like any film sub-genre, people can do it well and people can do it badly, and sometimes the bad ones are unfortunately the most famous. If it can be done well (i.e. not give you motion sickness for an hour and a half) it’s a great creative idea to use within a horror film, creating a more direct link between the filmmaker and the audience.

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  • felix@popcornhorror.com'
    October 30, 2013 at 4:43 pm
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    I think yes and no. Yes, leave the horror classics alone and its a mistake to try and recreate the look and feel of an 80s horror but the Slasher has alot of blood left in the bucket in my opinion. It just needs filmmakers to re-imagine it and fit it into a modern landscape. I think American Psycho and Switch Blade Romance are good examples of “modern” horror slashers with a twist.

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  • dean138@live.com'
    November 1, 2013 at 5:19 pm
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    ‘You’re Next was a great slasher. It really captured the things that made classics like Nightmare on Elm Street great – a subtle blend of horror and humour

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    • sammie888@gmail.com'
      November 1, 2013 at 5:26 pm
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      Yes. Anything to do with home/privacy being invaded is instantly scary.

      Reply
  • zombieslayer1995@live.com'
    November 1, 2013 at 5:21 pm
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    It’s hard to say what’s a slasher. Is Jaws a slasher, because it has a body count? There have been good modern films with a body count, but people are reluctant to call them slashers because of the nostalgia around films like Friday the 13th.

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    • robin194@hotmail.co.uk'
      November 1, 2013 at 5:23 pm
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      I would say a slasher has to have a character with recognisable features. Bruce the shark just looks like…well…a shark. The ‘slasher’ character has to have it’s own identity

      Reply
  • sammie888@gmail.com'
    November 1, 2013 at 5:25 pm
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    They need to stop re-creating the classics and come up with something that preys on modern fears.

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  • killswitch90@live.com'
    November 1, 2013 at 5:27 pm
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    Everyone loves a good slasher. As long as there is creative death scenes, I’m okay with it!

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  • bailey712_2000@hotmail.com'
    November 3, 2013 at 10:18 pm
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    If it has good death scenes then great

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  • felixfilms@hotmail.com'
    November 4, 2013 at 7:42 pm
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    New locations, different characters and some new ideas that whats needed. The Slasher formula can thrive in the right hands

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  • atybydw@gmail.com'
    November 5, 2013 at 8:28 pm
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    It needs someone to come up with an idea that avoids the ingrained cliches and the usual boring introduction of characters.
    As Sam Rami said, too many films have long scenes where nothing happens when they should get on with the action.

    Reply

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