Horror for the Weekend

It’s Friday, and if you’re as anti-social as me, you’re probably planning the horror you’ll get around the watching over the next two days. We suggest you start off with a really interesting documentary – Birth of the Living Dead, which was released on Tuesday.

Birth of the Living Dead

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A look back at the legendary Night of the Living Dead, the film shows how Romero gathered an unlikely team of Pittsburghers — policemen, iron workers, teachers, ad-men, housewives and a roller-rink owner — to shoot, with a revolutionary guerrilla, run-and-gun style, his seminal film. During that process Romero and his team created an entirely new and horribly chilling monster – one that was undead and feasted upon human flesh.

This new documentary also immerses audiences into the singular time in which the film was shot.  Archival footage of the horrors of Vietnam and racial violence combined with iconic music from the 60s invites viewers to experience how Romero’s tumultuous film reflected this period in American history.  “Birth of the Living Dead” shows us how this young filmmaker created a world-renowned horror film that was also a profound insight into how our society really works.

If you’re not convinced, here’s what’s being said about the film.

“What first appears to be a standard “making of” feature becomes a more ambitious combination of historical perspective and socio-political commentary… by placing Romero’s film at the epicenter of its volatile era, “Birth of the Living Dead” pays wide-ranging tribute to an enduring pop-cultural milestone.” – Jeff Shannon, The Seattle Times

“Rob Kuhns’ marvelous doc about the making of Night of the Living Dead looks at all the ways one low-budget, flesh-eating horror movie changed the world. It’s full of juicy anecdotes that detail how George A. Romero made necessity into the mother of nightmare invention, and EW’s Mark Harris and NPR’s Elvis Mitchell eloquently testify to how Night forged a new age of socially relevant horror almost by accident.” –Owen Gleiberman, Entertainment Weekly

“”CRITIC’S PICK! Mr. Romero, manifesting a self-effacing demeanor and sensible humanity, is a most agreeable raconteur.” –Andy Webster, The New York Times

Rob Zombie

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This Sunday is Rob Zombie’s birthday, so I’ll be digging out a few of his films for re-watching. While we would recommend you avoid his Halloween remake (and burn any copies of it you have laying around), House of 1000 Corpses and The Devil’s Rejects are worth seeing again.

The Lords of Salem is also an interesting one. It’s bizarre, surreal, and most of the time you won’t know what’s going on. But it’s still got some great visuals and fantastic sets that are worth checking out.

ABCs of Death

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We’ve talked a lot about ABCs of Death in the last few months, and the best thing about the anthology franchise is the search for the 26th director. Anyone is free to submit and entry, and the one making it to the final film is decided by public vote. We had a lot of fun watching the submissions, and there was a mix of genuinely eerie, fun, topical, and grotesque. The people behind the film today revealed a VOD release for ABCs of Death 1.5, a compilation of this years best entries under the letter ‘M’.

There was some amazing indie horror talent in this years competition, and we covered the finalists a while back, but even outside the finalists you’ll find some interesting shorts. We would urge you to look at the entries this weekend. No matter what kind of horror you’re into, you’ll find something you like. All of the entries can be found here.

And Here’s a few of our personal favourites to start you off.

M is for Mario

M is for Maternity Ward

M is for Mischief

Have a great weekend!

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