Fantastic Pop Culture CONSUME Posters

Even if you haven’t seen the film, the distinctive propaganda images featured in John Carpenter’s ‘They Live’ are among the most recognisable in horror. The CONSUME series takes Pop Culture’s most deserving darlings and transforms them into their true selves, alien overlords who unleash various forms of propaganda designed to keep the human race dumb, distracted and unquestioning. CONSUME is a satirical take on modern society with inspirational parody the iconic horror movie.

The series is the creation of artist Hal Hefner. Hal is an artist and storyteller that uses award winning art, design, writing and strategy to create experiences. He¬†currently consults for Ridley Scott’s company, 3AM, creating content for films including films such as ‘The Martian’ as a creative strategist. While with Fourth Wall Studios Hal helped to create a technology driven web series platform called Rides.tv which produced the Emmy award winning series Dirty Work. While with Ignition, Hal participated in the creation of digital experiences for many studios including Fox, Paramount, Netflix and the SyFy channel as well as brands like Nike, NFL and Playstation.

Check out some of our favourite takes on the CONSUME theme from Hal below, or find out more at the official CONSUME website.

161fe1ca9b01bc2559440602f126d48f

73f2dde2ff136ee48eb022ec084bdb88

2be478a7360212bea61beb0587067e5c

b9ae55a220eda92a9b4ce563fa466a3e

5f28a10eb72693c9d3f9fc59ec11bfe0

cb62ee9eec06a7482b7752f0ccde9012

2bacba9b45e8c89328321ae37fc0f2df

15ed207675243b8c588014ca0450711c

0e8f8f272fc3eeff3f5255a4fcc08608

1f5a27e6eec7115c815b1835cc9829ec

d928ea14bb6b377c6cc3916bce23e521

ce02abd5747405e24fd2d7bcc14c071a

7 thoughts on “Fantastic Pop Culture CONSUME Posters

  • crowdraven94@yahoo.com'
    May 20, 2015 at 1:52 am
    Permalink

    Good to know you can just infringe on someone else’s work just by claiming it’s a parody.

    Reply
    • noneemails@gmail.com'
      May 22, 2015 at 8:18 am
      Permalink

      You should look up parody law, dummy.

      Reply
      • crowdraven94@yahoo.com'
        May 22, 2015 at 12:11 pm
        Permalink

        Did you…did you upvote yourself?

        Anyway, this seems shaky ground to me. He’s not parodying They Live. He’s using They Live imagery to parody totally unrelated things. It might skate by, but I’d love to see a cease-and-desist just for the impossible laziness on display. “Hey, remember that movie? These are things you know like if they were in that movie.” That’s at the level of prop comedy.

        Reply
        • noneemails@gmail.com'
          June 9, 2015 at 1:25 am
          Permalink

          “He’s using They Live imagery to parody totally unrelated things.” So you admit it IS parody?

          Reply
          • crowdraven94@yahoo.com'
            June 9, 2015 at 1:51 pm
            Permalink

            It’s a parody of something completely unrelated, using IP from an established source in the same exact manner as that source. It’s like someone who doesn’t work for Mad making a cartoon of Alfred E. Neumann as Batman. You’re parodying Batman, but you’re using someone’s parody character to do it.

          • vcbowlin36@gmail.com'
            January 28, 2016 at 3:46 am
            Permalink

            “unrelated” ?? That’s a poor strawman argument considering Alfred E. Nuemwn bit was already done..now what he should and could do is A.E. Neumann with the “They live” consume face under a Batman mask just to say “screw you” secondwhiteline.. while you snivel over property that isn’t even yours and very doubtful you could even create anything on your own..
            Andy Warhol didn’t do much different.. yet all of sudden cause we have internet.. ip laws should change so someone who’s already made their bit with something can make even more?

          • crowdraven94@yahoo.com'
            January 28, 2016 at 3:37 pm
            Permalink

            I’m no fan, but Andy Warhol’s work was a direct commentary on something. This guy’s work is using someone else’s creative property to criticize something unrelated to it. I think there’d be a real argument that this is “superseding,” rather than “transformative.” He’s just doing the same thing Carpenter did, with Carpenter’s work.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *